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DanW View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Origins, and GX was once part of CSP.
    Posted: 19 January 2005 at 3:22pm

The Chalfonts are a group of three villages in south east Buckinghamshire, England. They are called Chalfont St Giles, Chalfont St Peter and Little Chalfont respectively. They are all situated within 5 miles of each other, sandwiched between High Wycombe and Rickmansworth.

At the time of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 949  there was no distinction made between the three separate villages: the whole area was known as Ceadeles funtan, which is Anglo Saxon meaning Caedele's Spring. The villages were however separated by 1237
 when in manorial rolls they were referred to as Chalfund Sancti Egidii, Chalfund Sancti Petri and Chalfund Parva respectively. The suffixes St Giles and St Peter are taken from the dedications of the churches of those two villages.

The town of Gerrards Cross was once a hamlet in the parish of Chalfont St Peter. It is named after the Gerrard family that, in the early Seventeenth century, owned a manor here.

Today the villages are popular with the rich and famous, as they are in very close proximity to London yet still retain their country feel.

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Eddie View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 January 2005 at 4:07pm
Originally posted by DanW DanW wrote:

The town of Gerrards Cross was once a hamlet in the parish of Chalfont St Peter. It is named after the Gerrard family that, in the early Seventeenth century, owned a manor here.




Sorry Dan. I don't believe that (the second sentence ) . Where did you get your article from?


Edited by Eddie
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 January 2005 at 4:47pm
was it true that the crossroads[A40} GX,was a haunt of a famous highway man who used to hold up carriages from oxford-london.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 January 2005 at 4:52pm
Originally posted by Eddie Eddie wrote:

Originally posted by DanW DanW wrote:

The town of Gerrards Cross was once a hamlet in the parish of Chalfont St Peter. It is named after the Gerrard family that, in the early Seventeenth century, owned a manor here.




Sorry Dan. I don't believe that (the second sentence ) . Where did you get your article from?

It was on....erm...I can't remember! Might have been on the About network.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 January 2005 at 5:04pm
Originally posted by chris chris wrote:

was it true that the crossroads[A40} GX,was a haunt of a famous highway man who used to hold up carriages from oxford-london.


Yes Chris. His name was Jack Shrimpton and the Bar at the Bull is named after him

Volume II
JACK SHRIMPTON Convicted for Murder and Highway Robberies.
Executed at St Michael's Hill in September, 1713
JOHN SHRIMPTON was born of good and reput-
able parents living at Penns, near High Wycombe, in
Buckinghamshire, who, bestowing so much education upon
him as might qualify him for a tradesman, put him out
an apprentice, when he was between fifteen and sixteen
years of age, to a soap-boiler in Little Britain, in London ;
but not serving out his apprenticeship there, he was turned
over to another soap-boiler in Ratcliff Highway.
   When he was out of his time he went into the army,
where he was some time in the troop of horse com-
manded by Major-General Wood; but, not finding such
preferment as he expected by being a soldier, he came
into England and took to the highway. He did always
the most damage betwixt London and Oxford, insomuch
that scarce a coach or horseman could pass him without
being robbed.
   Some time after committing one robbery, Mr Shrimpton,
being in London, accidentally lit into the company of the
common hangman, where he was taking a glass of wine; and
coming to the knowledge of his occupation he asked him
this question "What is the reason, when you perform your
office, that you put the knot just under the ear? For, in my
opinion, was you to fix it in the nape of the neck it would
be more easy to the sufferer." The hangman replied: " If
one Christian may believe another, I have hanged a great
many in my time, but upon my word, sir, I never had any
complaint as yet. However, if it should be your good luck
to make use of me, I shall, to oblige you, be so civil as to
hang you after your own way." But Shrimpton, not ap-
proving of the bangman's civility, told him that he desired
none of his favours, because they generally proved of a very
dangerous consequence.
   Another time, Jack Shrimpton, who also called himself
[242]

Parker, meeting a couple of bailiffs beyond Wycombe carry-
ing a poor farmer to jail, desired to know what the debt
might be; and being told six pounds odd money, he re-
quested them to go with him to the next ale-house and he
would pay it. They went along with him, where, taking a
bond of the farmer, whom he knew very well, he paid the
bailiffs their prisoner's debts and fees, and then parted.
   But Jack Shrimpton, waylaying the bailiffs, had no more
mercy on them than they had on the farmer, for he took
away what money he paid them, and about forty shillings
besides ; after which he rode back again to the farmer and,
regaling him with a treat of a guinea, cancelled his bond,
and then went in pursuit of new adventures.
   A little while after, Shrimpton, travelling on the road,
met with a poor miller who was going to turn highwayman
himself. Thus roving along, and meeting (as above said)
with Shrimpton, he held up an oaken plant, for he had no
other arms, and bade him stand, thinking that word was
sufficient to scare any man out of his money. Shrimpton,
perceiving the simplicity of the fellow, fired a pistol at him,
which (though he purposely missed him) put our new robber
into such an agony that he surrendered himself to Shrimp-
ton's mercy; who presently said: " Surely, friend, thou art but
a young highwayman, or else you would have knocked me
down first and bade me stand afterwards." The poor miller
told him his misfortunes; on which Shrimpton took some
compassion, and quoth he: " I am a highwayman myself,
and am now waiting on this road for a certain neighbour of
yours, who I expect will come this way by and by with six-
score pounds ; therefore if you will be assisting in the
robbery of him, you shall have half the booty." The miller
was very thankful for this kind offer, and resolved to stand
by him to the very utmost. Then Shrimpton, having told him
again that it was not long since he had robbed one of his
neighbours of one hundred and fifty pounds, further said:
" Honest friend, whilst I ride this way, you go that way,
and if you should meet him whom I have told you of, be sure
to knock him down and take all he has from him, without
[243]
telling him why or wherefore; and in case I should meet
him, I'll serve him with the same sauce."
   They both separated, and went in search of their prey,
till at last, upon the joining of two roads, they met together
again. Shrimpton, wondering why the person he wanted did
not yet come, ordered the miller to follow him still, saying:
" Without doubt we shall catch the old cuff anon." But as
he was thus encouraging his new companion, who was just
at his horse's heels, he took up his stick and gave Shrimpton
such a smart blow betwixt neck and shoulders that he felled
him to the ground; being then able to deal with him, he
robbed him of about fourscore guineas, and bade him go
quietly about his business, or otherwise he would have him
hanged, according to his own confession, for lately robbing
his neighbour. Thus the biter was bitten ; but Shrimpton
swore he would never more take upon him to teach
strangers how to rob on the highway.
   This notorious malefactor pursued his wicked courses
a long while, till at last, being in Bristol, where he resided
for some months, he was drinking one night very late at
a bawdy-house in St James's Churchyard, when a watch-
man, going his rounds, and hearing a great noise of swear-
ing and cursing in the house, compelled Shrimpton to
go along with him to the watch-house. As they were
going together through Wine Street he shot the watch-
man through the body and flung his pistol away, that it
might not be found; but some men, happening to go by
at the same time, apprehended Shrimpton, and the watch-
man dying on the spot, they secured him till morning,
when, carrying him before a magistrate, he was committed 
to Newgate, in Bristol, where he behaved himself very
audaciously.
   At length, being brought to a trial, he was convicted
not only for wilful murder but also for five robberies on
the highway. When he came to the place of execution
at St Michael's Hill he was turned off without showing
any signs of repentance, on Friday, the 4th of September,
1713.
[244]

Newgate Calendar Vol. II Table of Contents / The Complete Newgate Calendar

(from http://tarlton.law.utexas.edu/lpop/etext/newgate2/shrimpto.h tm


Edited by Eddie
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DanW View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 January 2005 at 8:42am

"It is named after the Gerrard family that, in the early Seventeenth century, owned a manor here."

You are quite right Eddie, this appears to be complete rubbish. GX formed in 1859 by taking land from 5 surrounding parishes.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 January 2005 at 7:17pm
I wonder if Jack Shrimpton is related to the 1960's model Jean Shrimpton, whose family were builders from Penn?

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 January 2005 at 7:28pm
Originally posted by Rich Kid Rich Kid wrote:

I wonder if Jack Shrimpton is related to the 1960's model Jean Shrimpton, whose family were builders from Penn?
 
There's a task for you RK , try and find out
They say Kesey's dead; But never trust a prankster;even underground.
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